Misconceptions & Myths

Misconceptions & Myths about Feng Shui

1. Classical Chinese feng shui  has no place  in the modern western world.

The truth is, the dynamics of nature and the relationship between the man and the earth have changed much less than culture has, and in practice Feng Shui is as effective in the middle of a cosmopolitan 21st century city as in a remote and mountainous part of China. Of course some details of the practice change, but the fundamental principles do not.

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2. Feng Shui is about placement of  furniture.

The truth is that Feng Shui is about understanding, analysing and therefore, the most important time to have a Feng Shui consultation is BEFORE you buy a house. Next most important is to consider structural and landscaping changes to enable the building to channel as much of the natural energies as possible. The benefits of good room use, furniture placement, and colours of decor can be very significant, but come third in line after landscape considerations, and building structure and orientation.

3. Feng Shui results depend on intention.

The truth is Feng Shui is based upon complex and specific calculations of planetary movement, detailed understanding of the patterns of energy in the earth and highly specific mappings between the symbolism of the environment and the human body.

All of this takes many years of serious study, and only the merest ‘tasters’ of it have so far been published in English language books. Please note that deeper and more extensive knowledge will gradually become available in the near future in English language books published by Master Chan Kun Wah and other members of his Foundation. A strong intuition is certainly required in addition to high levels of technical training, but it is self delusion to believe that it can reliably be done by intuition alone.

4. Feng Shui can be learned over a few weekends.

To reach even a basic level of proficiency takes several years of serious study of materials from an authentic source (which are still few in number). To reach a high level of skill takes many years of dedicated study and practice.

5. Feng Shui is about positioning symbolic cures and charms around your home.

Symbolic cures and charms are occasionally used, but in general, serious Feng Shui remedies consist of:

  • Exterior features – alterations to fences, hedges and gates, positioning of water, ponds and fountains, which are instrumental in regulating energy, or ‘chi’ Building structure – even a degree or two of difference in the angle of a front door can change the energy of a building.
  • Room usage – some rooms have energy suited to study, some to sleeping, and some to avoiding! Use of colours and natural materials to balance energies. Use of meticulously chosen times, which imbue alterations with the energy of that moment. Good Feng Shui practice in the West should be invisible to your guests, not leave your home looking like a Chinatown gift shop!

6. Dowsing and eliminating electromagnetic stress can substitute Feng Shui.

The truth is that although many such techniques are valuable and effective in their own right, they are complimentary to Feng Shui. The core of real Feng Shui is to understand how the energies of the earth and the cosmos change over time, and how to use building design to harness and regulate them. This provides benefits far deeper and more powerful than simply screening the harmful energies from electrical equipment and the like.

7. Interior decoration and clean environments are the forms of Feng Shui .

Once again, aesthetic harmony and balance are indeed important in Feng Shui, but clean and orderly is a basic requirement for most things; a formula one racing car must be kept clean and tidy, but you will need to know an awful lot more if you want to work in the pits!